History of Science Journalism

Discovery

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Ten 10 seconds of  credits followed by a medium shot of Charles Tisseyre. Ten 10 seconds of credits followed by a medium shot of Charles Tisseyre.
Charles Tisseyre: Good evening ladies and gentlemen. The climate of our planet is changing. The accumulation of greenhouse gases is causing global warming.
Tonight we are devoting the entire show to this phenomenon, increasingly worrisome to scientists, because it bodes of changes that we are just beginning to experience.
Photos of a landslide. Photos of a landslide.
October 98: In four days, Central America received the amount of rainfall normally received in six years.
Photos of a flood. Photos of a flood.
30 000 people disappeared in the floods and landslides in America... The worst storm in history.
Photos of people trying to de-ice their cars after the ice storm. Photos of people trying to de-ice their cars after the ice storm.
January 98: Québec experienced its worst ice storm. For weeks, entire cities were plunged into darkness, without heat.
Photos of ice. Photos of ice.
Voice in the background: Some 1 300 000 homes.

CT: All this because it was a little too warm outdoors.
One degree lower and it would have snowed and no one would remember it today.
Photos of the drought in Texas. Photos of the drought in Texas.
For more than a month in Texas, the temperature never dropped below 30 degrees Celsius, even at night.
Hundreds of people died. The farmers lost 3 billion dollars.
Medium shot of Charles Tisseyre. Medium shot of Charles Tisseyre.
Today, most experts maintain that these events are not simply vagaries of nature. The entire planet is warming and this is a recent phenomenon.
Photos of Earth taken from space with an information chart showing the average temperature of the planet rising over the past 100 years. Photos of Earth taken from space with an information chart showing the average temperature of the planet rising over the past 100 years.
Since the end of the Middle Ages, or around 1400, the average temperature of the Northern Hemisphere has always varied within a very narrow range of less than half a degree.
And it had never exceeded the ceiling of 14 degrees. In the 20th Century, the temperature began to rise abruptly.
It has risen by half a degree in the past one hundred years and should rise two and even three more degrees within the next one hundred years.
Medium shot of Charles Tisseyre. Medium shot of Charles Tisseyre.
Two degrees seems like nothing, but do you know the difference between the Ice Age and now? 15 degrees, 30?
No, at most 4 to 6 degrees.